St Andrew, Thropton

Thropton Anglican Church

In 1902 a Mission Church was built by public subscription on a piece of ground on the east bank of the Rithe, a small stream which runs into the river Coquet a little way out of the village, on land owned and kindly granted by Lord Armstrong. This proved to be a boon to the local Anglican Community who live in the outlying areas of our parish

A short history of Thropton

Thropton is a village on the main road from Rothbury to Harbottle about two miles from Rothbury. The small stream called the Wreigh or Rithe flows into the River Coquet.

The bridge over the Wreigh was built in 1810 by George Robson as a cost of £360 exclusive of cartage. The cost was met to the extent of £160 by public subscription and the rest by the county, the laying of the foundation stone on 24th May 1810 was done with a religious and military ceremony, followed by a procession to Thropton where a large party sat down to dinner and spent the day in the greatest harmony.

The bridge  is a plain but picturesque hump-backed stone arch. It took the place of an older “stock” or timber bridge on a slightly different site which is now on private land belonging to Wreighburn House.

David Dippy Dixon, a local historian of note, says that there were, in the early nineteenth century two crosses, one at the west end of the village, where the road leading to the ford over the river Coquet to Tosson crosses the high road to Harbottle and the other as the east end in front of the Cross Keys Inn

Thropton tower is mentioned in 1415 when it was held by William Green. It may have formed part of Thropton Old Hall which was demolished in 1811 when the Catholic presbytery was rebuilt. There is still a bastle house on the south side of the road to the west end of the village it has been considerably modernised and is still used as a family home in 2012.